This Is How Divvy Gains Traction

Background Reading

Summary

According to officials, an agreement with a Chicago real estate developer marks the first private purchase of a Divvy station since the bike-sharing program was launched in mid-2013. (Anthony Souffle / Chicago Tribune)

According to officials, an agreement with a Chicago real estate developer marks the first private purchase of a Divvy station since the bike-sharing program was launched in mid-2013. (Anthony Souffle / Chicago Tribune)


TakeAways

BikeShare systems like Divvy are the ‘canary in the mine shaft‘ for Urban Cycling Movement. If you cannot get ‘last mile‘ riders exiting or boarding commuter trains to use such systems, it will ultimately fail as will the notion of having bicycles considered as a form of public transportation.

Bicycling in the northern cities of America is plagued by the on again, off again nature of cycling following the summer months. Getting anything approaching a year-round use of bicycles is challenging. Streets are icy, wet and full of snow. Bridges are dangerous and in fact something as simple as a puncture on a sub-zero day can be dangerous should a bus not be available in time to prevent wet soaking clothes from generating hypothermia.

Divvy offers a chance to bring cycling into the mainstream where it is populated by ordinary people who are not social activists and revolutionaries but instead folks trying to get from point A to point B safely and inexpensively.

We need systems like Divvy to succeed to replace in the minds of the general public their most recent encounter with Critical Mass with something far more welcoming.