Yet Another Car Clogs Up The Road To The Dismay Of Cyclists

Background Reading

Summary

I thought she was driving another Smart car. But then the door opens and this happens.

I thought she was driving another Smart car. But then the door opens and this happens.

Stacy Zoern was born with muscular atrophy. Among many difficulties with which she has to cope, she has never been able to normally drive a car. She always has to deal with either clunky wheelchair vans or needing her friends to drive her places. She always wanted another option that enabled her to be more independent. When she found the Kenguru, she thought she had finally found the answer. However, even though it would be an ideal solution, there are many things that need to happen before Stacy can have one of these.

One problem was that the company lacked the funding to continue with testing and production. Since Stacy wanted one of these cars as soon as possible, she decided to actively try to help them. In June 2010, she started her own company, Community Cars, Inc.

After a great deal of hard work to gather investors, she was able to merge her company with their company after only one year. They are now manufacturing a car that can be used by people in manual wheelchairs, as well as one that is driven using a joystick. The latter is the one that will help Stacy the most with her lack of upper body strength.

These vehicles are also supposed to be affordable. They will not cost $100,000 like specialized vans, but they are only supposed to be around $25,000. They are currently taking reservations online to gauge an idea of how many cars they need to manufacture.


TakeAways

I guess this proves that ‘not all automobiles are bad‘. So are we going to have to deny this woman a place to park her ‘car’ because we need the space for a bike lane where able-bodied people can run red lights and ignore stop signs?

Will the folks who use these need to be licensed? Certainly the level of impairment of the individual who operates the ‘car‘ will have to be judged. But why not also have that same test for the able-bodied bike drivers who seem to be unable to avoid collisions with pedestrians in the crosswalk?

Inquiring minds wanna know. Just saying.