New Survey Shows 66% of Millennials Want to Live in the Suburbs

Background Reading

Summary

Karla Kingsley and Matt Chwierut chose a single-family house in a neighborhood in Portland, Ore., based on its proximity to the city center. PHOTO: AMANDA LUCIER FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Karla Kingsley and Matt Chwierut chose a single-family house in a neighborhood in Portland, Ore., based on its proximity to the city center. PHOTO: AMANDA LUCIER FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL


TakeAways

I find this survey encouraging because it signals the inevitable ‘growing up‘ of this particular generation. What might be in order however is the shift from an intercity bicycle infrastructure to something more accommodating of Millennials who will be living in suburbs and possibly commuting into the city.

Things like trails with connectors begin to emerge as very important. Suburban towns along trunk lines (e.g. Illinois Prairie Path) become valuable links in a multi-modal trip. In fact trails like the Bloomingdale (606) are ripe for becoming part of a bicycle superhighway.

But the distance from the Loop would mean that many of these aging adults might want to consider either commuter trains, buses or even car pooling. Time will tell. But just in time for their maturation the collision-avoidance systems will have come into their own.