Alderman wants $25 bike registration fee

By Lauren Zumbach and John Byrne, Tribune reporters
2:06 pm, October 23, 2013

Source: Chicago Tribune

© CHRIS SWEDA, CHICAGO TRIBUNE Jessica Smith rides through the intersection of Milwaukee Avenue and Desplaines Street in Chicago on Wednesday. Smith said she was prepared to flout the rule if Chicago aldermen passed a plan for an annual bike registration fee.

© CHRIS SWEDA, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Jessica Smith rides through the intersection of Milwaukee Avenue and Desplaines Street in Chicago on Wednesday. Smith said she was prepared to flout the rule if Chicago aldermen passed a plan for an annual bike registration fee.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s vision of Chicago as a bike-friendly metropolis found itself in the cross hairs of an alderman’s proposal for a $25 bike tax Wednesday.

South Side Ald. Pat Dowell, 3rd, floated a plan to charge bike owners an annual $25 registration fee as a way to raise millions of dollars next year and provide an alternative to the mayor’s proposal to hike cable television taxes to bring in about $9 million. Dowell also said she wants to require bikers to take a “rules of the road” safety class.

Emanuel, who this month led a bicycle tour of the Logan Square neighborhood as part of Chicago Ideas Week, said he would look at Dowell’s plan. But he then linked his pro-cyclist agenda with recent success in drawing technology firms to the city, and essentially laid out why he almost certainly won’t support the idea.

“The two are not correlated, but it’s not an accident Google and Motorola decided to move their headquarters where the first protected bike lane went, and also where you have a good mass transit stop,” Emanuel said in a meeting with the Tribune editorial board after unveiling his proposed 2014 budget.

“She can propose it. It’s her idea. But I would argue I don’t think that’s the right way to go,” Emanuel said.

Without the mayor’s backing, Dowell’s plan stands very little chance of success.

Since he took office, Emanuel has introduced protected bike lanes, increased the number of bike lanes citywide and launched the popular Divvy bike rental program.

Cyclists riding on Wednesday bike-friendly Milwaukee Avenue took a dim view of the tax idea.

Jourdon Gullett, of Chicago, said Dowell’s plan seemed “a little extreme.”

“Are they going to make every little kid riding down the sidewalk get one?” Gullett asked.

Ron Burke, executive director of the Active Transportation Alliance, said he doesn’t know of a single U.S. city with a bicycle licensing program. While many cities have considered it, the idea is always rejected as too complicated and unlikely to generate enough revenue to cover costs, Burke said.

“We share the goal of wanting to improve safety, but we think there are better ways to achieve it,” he said.

Biker Jessica Smith said she was prepared to flout the rule.

“I’d probably just ignore it,” she said, laughing.

Emanuel nodded at the difficulty of enforcing such registration, especially in a city with entrenched violent crime. “I surely don’t want police involved in policing whether you bought a bike license,” he said.

lzumbach@tribune.com

jebyrne@tribune.com


TakeAways

Following on the heels of a speech today about the possibility of a nearly $1 Billion tax burden for city residents should the negotiations over pension changes fail it becomes clear that aldermen are wasting no time trying to offer up ways to help meet such a shortfall. Currently the city has a $496 Million tax burden which will double in the worst case scenarios.

But if we know anything about negotiations here in Illinois we can guess that regardless of the deal reached on pensions at the state level it will most certainly mean more taxes for everyone in the city limits. Cyclists have enjoyed a fair amount of increase in their “bicycle comfort quotient“. On the other hand schools in poorer communities have been closing at an alarming rate. Students are now walking further and sometimes through gang turf that puts them at risk of physical harm. Tax payers (especially homeowners) see the situation as possibly less than fair when schools and teacher jobs are sacrificed while a new stadium is being funded and new bike lanes built.

So rest assured that no one who is not counting on riding in the next Chicago Critical Mass Ride is going to waste too much wondering whether a $25 tax annual tax on cyclists will deter some who might otherwise join the trend to wait another year. Cyclists need to understand the nature of the climate in which they are living and be sensitive to the perception that theirs is a selfish, entitled outlook that ignores the plight of others.