Hurley Gardens – Wheaton, IL

A Gem of A Garden

Wheaton Park District (logo)

Facility: Hurley Gardens

Location: west of the Adare Dr. & Creekside Dr. intersection

Description: Hurley Gardens offers historic significance and a tranquil park setting which unites yesterday and today. The gardens were originally part of the 160-acre estate known as Hurley Farm. The garden structures (loggia and gazebo) date to sometime between 1910 and 1913, and the swimming pool which is now a reflecting pool was added in the 1920s. The formal design of the garden, the loggia and the gazebo reflect the Neo-Classical Revival style, and were influenced by the 1893 Columbian Exposition which was held in Chicago. Hurley Gardens was dedicated as a Wheaton Historical Landmark in 1991.

Amenities:
• 3.20 Acres
• One Tennis Court
• Open Play/Grass field
• Fountain, Reflecting Pool, Historic Structures

Summary

Hurley is tucked away on the far west side of Wheaton. It lies behind the Marionjoy Rehabilitation Hospital whose entrance is on Roosevelt Road. The history of the place (circa 1910-1913) goes back a few years. Fortunately it was saved from becoming a parking lot to provide an oasis of tranquility that is totally unexpected to those who visit it for the first time.

Hurley Gardens - Wheaton, IL

A few years ago I introduced my now deceased riding buddy and his son to this park. It was something that I always considered a place to cherish. It has a tranquil beauty that has not been diminished over the years and in fact it shows every sign of care and restoration that it deserved.

Bicycle riders will find it a great place to arrive at mid-journey. They can walk the grounds and enjoy luncheon or snacks before continuing on their way perhaps to Cantigny Park where one can visit the Robert R. McCormick mansion or the Cantigny First Division Museum.

And then of course there is the nearby Assumption Cemetery of the Joliet Diocese. Or even nearby Blackwell F.P. where you can enjoy some hiking, canoeing or more biking along the roads inside the preserve.

The Images

I took these images rather late in the day under what could be described as overcast skies. They in fact tended to “wash out” a bit. These are JPEGs made directly in-camera with a very subtle bit of post-processing. I did this to discover how the camera would handle the conditions. When I visit again it will probably be to take images which are in RAW file format. This will allow me to do a better job in controlling the contrast range of the images.